30 October, 2015

The Orange Pass Hunter Disc Frames are Here

Happy Halloween! The new disc-brake Pass Hunters have just arrived. We're doing quality control checks and taking photos today. We'll have them on the site Monday. The disc-version has the same geometry as the canti-brake version, but with some cool new details.

We also have some new handlebars and the black drillium cranks. Details coming soon.
Finally, the Philly Bike Expo is November 7 and 8. It's a great show and we'll have some new products on display. Please come if you can.


19 comments:

teamdarb said...

Damn you all!!! Time to go down to the blood bank.
Wilson

Anonymous said...

Finally! Got a Straggler on the way, but n+1 rule applies here.

Anonymous said...

what's the tire clearance?

Anonymous said...

Any thoughts on selling fork only?

eric said...

Well... Monday then!

Lenora Bruckdorfer said...

We will stop at your Philly booth - see you there.

VeloOrange said...

Selling forks? Nope, sorry. We feel that forks and frames should be designed, and used, together.

These fit up to 38mm (actual size) tires.

Tom said...

What size frameset is that built bike shown?

VeloOrange said...

Tom, that's a 57.

Anonymous said...

Love it. I see the answer above but I'll echo the sentiment of wanting to be able to get just the fork separately -- it's a work of art! Someday maybe I'll be able to build my ideal lugged mixte with disc brakes.

David Seipel said...

How do you like the Gevenalle shifters?

VeloOrange said...

@David

The shifters are great! Setup wasn't the smoothest, but functionally, they're a blast. It's easy to crank through gears, and the cables stay out of the way, even with a front rack. I had my eye on Gevenalle for a while and had a dynasys xtr derailleur so these seemed like the obvious choice.

-Clint

teamdarb said...

Ere ere ere! And a vote for another true mixte frame set. One that fits tires in the 40mm+.

didier said...

Question about the frames: just politely wondering why disc brakes would be better for randonneurs. I understand that brevets and such can be a bit rainy, but they certainly don't have the kind of descents you have on mountain bikes, and you're not using carbon rims so there's not much issue with stopping and stuff. I think I have had the same set of brake pads on my road bike for 15 years and while they're getting pretty worn, there's no imminent emergency and the rims themselves show just about zero wear.

To be clear, I'm certainly not at all opposed to change as such, just wondering.

For one thing, it seems like all that metal that has to be added to the fork blade isn't going to help its suppleness. For another, it would seem that an imperative of touring/randonneur bikes is self-sufficiency. What if your brakes malfunction way out in the boonies?

BTW, do you recommend mechanical or hydraulic brakes? Which particular setups do you favor?

VeloOrange said...

I'll write more about disc brakes soon. We've been testing a bunch and will soon be able to recommend some based on actual use. BTW, Clint just installed Shimano hydraulic brakes on my new Pass Hunter, so we'll see how those work out. But overall I do like the braking power-- still, if I were going touring in Siberia I'd use a frame with canti-brakes for ease of repair.

Chris

Mike said...

Just got back from the Philly bike show. This bike stole my heart. It's so beautiful! I will have one soon.

Anonymous said...

Any plans for a disc Camargue? Would be great to have discs for when doing more technical offroad riding, and the additional power when loaded up would be nice too!

Jim Mearkle said...

Could someone get a replacement fork if they somehow damaged theirs without wrecking the frame?

VeloOrange said...

We do have replacement forks.