14 April, 2008

New VO Rando Frame Photos

Here are a couple of brand new VO rando frames.

The first is for Kathryn in a custom creme color. I wasn't sure I'd like this color, but I think it looks great on the finished bike. The paint is so shiny the photos appear wavy. More photos can be found here.

The second bike is Steve's and is now being painted. These photos show the just brazed frame. The next step is sanding filing and cleanup prior to painting. Note that while all the lugs are silver brazed, the fill in the dropout attachment is brass because of the gap to be filled. More photos are here.

17 comments:

AH said...

I am admittedly no expert, but aren't there "gaps" where the seat/chainstays meet the rear dropout on the cream-coloured frame? That's an area of VO frames I've always found particularly attractive.

Michael S said...

I like the color a lot. Very unique. I really like how simple yet elegant Johnny's frames look. Very nice work.

How is the delivery schedule going? In other words, is the 14 month wait accurate?

old guy said...

I don't know if it's my monitor, but the color looks more like khaki or light caramel than cream. I like it.

elvisVelo said...

I would be interested to get in on the thinking going on behind tubing selection. I know it gets a bit technical, and could get controversial, maybe, but it is an important element of a bike like this, and being a paying customer with an inquiring mind, I would like to request that some of that sort of tubing info be shared with us, if it ain't too much trouble.

gunnar berg said...

I like the color a lot. I think it would set off honey leather particlarily well.

I have frames built by four different builders. I've noticed that frame builders are a lot less interested in tube types than we are. They tend to just make them as light as practical for the use and rider weight. That said, I'm Jonny's thinking too.

gunnar berg said...

Jeez. Proof read...S/B "I'm interested in Jonny's thinking too."

kathryn said...

glad others like the color. i was aiming at something old fashioned and restrained in an earth tone. it's a stock ppg truck fleet color.

i also see the gaps, and am waiting to hear why the deviation from what we expected.

Michael S said...

From looking at Chris' Picasa album, it looks like the seat/chain stay connection to the dropouts is consistent with photos of Kathryn's frame, other than Chris' personal bike and the Orange Italian-style bike. I'm sure people can chime in who actually have one, but maybe this detail is just more apparent with the lighter paint color?

Anonymous said...

That's not a gap it's either grease or frame coating.

kathryn said...

at first i thought the brazing was different from previous models, but i've looked at them on the web, and really there is no difference. i'm sure there is no gap between the brazing and the chainstay or dropout, and i bet she's a beauty to ride. i can't wait.

James said...

Why the Herse brake cable hanger? Does the more conventional stay mounted hanger offer no real
benefits? I assume the hanger pictured was made by Johnny using chromoly rod?

Anonymous said...

Its frame saver. I know because as careful as you want to be about not making a mess with that stuff, it gets all over the place anyway! I remember wiping the frame saver off of the drops with a rag and i think I would have noticed a gap... No deviation, no gaps. I see what people are talking about but I'm sure its framesaver... whick when dried on there looked kind of caramel, and I thought, "wow, caramel luglining, that would be nice,carmel lug lining!"
Johnny

Anonymous said...

Lets just be clear that both styles of cable stops/hangers work, and work well. And, it always seemed to me that something resisting tension in a linear as opposed to a cantilevered fashion, made more sense.
Johnny Coast

elvisVelo said...

I am glad Johnny C. is reading our writing. So, I ask again, a bit more directly...
J.C., would you share a bit about what the thinking is on the tubes you are using, what the fork is made of, etc.
I know that tubing discussions can get messy, circular, or worse, but we might all learn something too.
Thanks

Anonymous said...

Ok, let me open the royal can of worms! I'll just start with a few simple things I look for when designing a frame. Mostly what my concerns are when considering a rider and his/her frame is tubing wall thickness, and where I should place the butted sections. Geometry aside, I account for the intended purpose of said bicycle, rider's weight, and the rider's expectations of his/her new bicycle. The way a bicycle can feel and handle can all be minipulated by butting placement (and of course wall thickness and tubing diameter). For example, if a stiffer frame is desired, longer butts in the down tube section at the BB joint resist torsional forces produced by pedaling... If you follow this type of logic, prodicing a flexible frame that absorbs the beatings a road can dole out provides a more comfortable ride. Additionally, other choices like round-oval-round VS. oval chainstays all come together to create a frame with the desired characteristics.
I place the longer section of the butting at the joints where I want the most strength, and the heavier the rider, the thicker the tubing. A rider's weight and the intended purpose of the bike determines how flexible that frame should be. In other words, choose tubing based on the demands put on the frame, riders weight and intended use... I think that may be the ultimate deciding factor behind tubing choice, because an overly stiff frame under a tired rider is undesirable...etc and so on.
Johnny Coast

Anonymous said...

What's the red bike with a chaincase in the corner Johnny?

Anonymous said...

Ha! Thats my Atala city bike (kind of a clunker), A friend and I like Atalas... I bought it from a guy in the city, a buddy who owns a bike shop. I got a fair deal on it and I ride it to the coffee shop on sunny days...
Johnny