22 December, 2007

RH Hanger


I know that a lot of you have been waiting for our reproduction Herse-style hangers. The final prototype just arrived by Fed Ex. They are now going into production. They will sell for around $20-$25 a pair and will also be available at wholesale prices to bike shops.

Functionally they are not a great improvement over other hangers, but they did adorn most Rene Herse bikes and many from Singer and other constructeurs. Even today they are used by Toei. And they are pretty enough to hang from your Christmas tree. How's that for bike bling?

Update: I forgot to thank Mike Barry of Mariposa, one of the world's finest constructeurs, for providing us with details, measurements, and photographs of his original RH hangers that are the basis of our reproductions. And thanks to Peter Weigle who arranged all that.

BTW, Mike is retiring today; there will be no more Mariposa bikes.

24 comments:

Michael S said...

Looks great, Chris.

Now, please make sure all these fantastic projects are finished 14 months from now... :)

Anonymous said...

I like these very much. What makes them three times less expensive than the Toei ones?

Alf

Chris Kulczycki said...

Alf, Ha! Isn't the question really, "Why do the Toei hangers cost three times as much?"

The VO hangers are made on a CNC mill in a fairly large production run (large for such an odd component). This means that once the process is figured out the machine will just keep doing it over and over with no human input, so there is little labor cost. Perhaps the others are machined by hand and made in small batches? This would mean a machinist has to "operate" the machine. But that's just speculation. I really don't know.

Anonymous said...

Chris, I was just trying to be polite ;)

Picture-wise, I don't see too much difference in the quality. I know what you mean by CNC, but whoa, if Toei makes theirs one by one, that'd take ages.

I'll be interested in two sets for now. Will do some more shopping at your online store over the Christmas break.

Alf

patrollers said...

Unique and affordable. Another winner!

gunner berg said...

They're really beautiful! I'm going to need at least 2 sets, whether they're made in China, Taiwan or Maryland. Just a great job.

Dan Gurney, Mr. Kindergarten said...

Gee, I feel dumb.

What's an Rh Hanger? Does it connect the brake cable to the wire straddling cantilever brakes?

I hope I'm not the only person who would ask this. Just the first brave enough to ask.

lamplightsg said...

I've been waiting for an affordable set of these hangers for a while now. Thank you very much for making it happen!

Anonymous said...

Those are pretty. I may have to buy two pair and get my ears pierced ;-)

Chris Kulczycki said...

Dan, Look here to see how the work:

http://tinyurl.com/2jzfcr

or here:

http://tinyurl.com/3cosn3

It's interesting to go through that site and see how the hangers changed over the decades.

Dan Gurney, Mr. Kindergarten said...

Thank you, Chris. My guess was better than I thought. Nice bike bling, like so much of your VO offerings.

RH must stand for something, though, huh?

Anonymous said...

RH stands for Roller-Hanger! You can put them on your Rene Herse, Rivendell Hilsen or Rock-Hopper.

Phillip Franklin said...

How well would these work when using road type levers such as Campy with traditional older or retro canti brakes? The Dia-Compe roller hangers I have been using seem to require more travel in the road levers. Those roller hangers really do look cool though.

C said...

Barry retiring?? What a loss for the cycling world but I wish him the best and many flat-free miles as he rides off into the sunset!!

Adam said...

I too wish Mike a happy retirement. I was on the list for a Mariposa bike, and they were, until yesterday, absolutely my favourite randonneur bikes in production. I'll have to try to find a used one in my size!

Those roller hangers look truly wonderful.

Andrew said...

Fantastic Chris. I'll have to get a pair to put on my Toei! :)

mpetry912 said...

Dang, those are cool. Happy holidays everybody!

Mark Petry
Bainbridge Island, WA

david_nj said...

Those roller hangers look neat. However, I have found that with modern road levers and center-pull brakes, a regular hanger of this type doesn't give you enough cable travel. For a couple of years, I've used a Campy Ergo setup with Mafac brakes, and to amplify the cable pull I've used those really wide cable hangers often found in cyclocross. They won't win any awards for elegance, but they seem pretty much required.

Joel said...

Bittersweet news about Mike. He certainly deserves a long and happy retirement.

It is sad there will be no more Mariposa bicycles. Mike had an uncanny sense of proportion. His bikes are not minimalist, nor are they over adorned. Seems every bike he made had a unique touch that perfectly suited the owner.

I hope some of our fine young builders devote a lot of time studying what Mike did.

Joel said...

Oh. And some builder ought to check and see whether Mike is willing to sell his rack designs.

They are beautiful in the French tradition but unique and very practical.

Phillip Franklin said...

Cool Rene Herse posted here:
http://www.reneherse.com/RHtinyblack.html

gunner berg said...

I agree with david nj about rollers (also about China - another story, especially considering our opposing political stances). I shorten the straddle cable as I can. This geometry requires more hand pressure, but reduces the required pull distance.

Anonymous said...

count me in for at least one pair

Karl said...

As someone who got their Mariposa bike last year (after the full 18 months), I am feeling pretty fortunate to have got in ahead of Mike's retirement date.

The 18-month wait drove me crazy at the time but all was forgiven when the bicycle arrived. Best of all was living in Toronto and getting to ride it home down ravine trails from Mike's Cranfield Road workshop.

Karl