17 November, 2015

Campeur: Classic Modern

by Igor

Campeur is a beautiful frameset. Its classic, french aesthetic is understated, subtle, and reliable. Handling is neutral both unloaded and loaded, which is the highest compliment for a touring bike. We built this frame up to remind audiences that you don't need through-axles, carbon forks, hydro-Di2, or even aero brakes to have a good time on your bike.

There is beauty in simplicity.











15 comments:

Joe McNamara said...

It's a beauty! Just got back to riding steel myself and love it.

Jean-Francois Caron said...

You know you're a bit of a snob when you see a bike like that and think "It's a shame about the rear deraileur..."

snook91901 said...

What color tape is that under the shellac? I love it.

voyageoftheeye said...

Who lost the dust caps?

All those solid brazed on rack mounts going spare while using odd mounts on the brakes? Time that someone figured out a perfect rack.

I am being picky, It would be a top choice if I was in a shop buying...

Stan said...

Beautiful bicycle! Would love to have one myself. This has probably been asked many times before, but any change you are going to offer a size 65cm for the Campeur (or the Camarque) in the (near) future?

Nathan said...

Dare I ask what I setup like this would run retail? I need to start saving my pennies...because that bike is stunning.

Matthew in Seattle said...

Nice build. Just curious -- any reason the front rack is not mounted a few inches lower so that the front fender can be attached to the top platform of the rack?

Chris said...

I thought the same thing

VeloOrange said...

@Jean-Francois Caron,
Not as pretty as Huret or Simplex, but we wanted to build it up with easily found, affordable, modern parts. The 9 speed Deore derailleurs are super solid and have a great range. Also, they are road shifter compatible.

@voyageoftheeye,
Dust caps are in place and they are self-extracting. Mounting racks to the cantilever studs is a classic style for racks because it is rock solid.

@Stan,
63cm is the largest we'll go. When you start getting into really big sizes, it is better to go custom and tailor the frame and construction to your individual body geometry. Plus if we did make a 65cm, inevitably someone would ask for a 67cm. Talk to your local frame builder!

@Nathan,
Retail price would probably be around $2500. Which is a pretty good deal considering it's tour-ready.

@Matthew in Seattle,
It's a show and test bike. Take stuff off, put prototypes on. Disassemble to take to shows. Customer test rides. It isn't quite as elegant as having the rack permanently mounted to the fender, but it is very functional and easy to work on and adjust.

-Igor

Craig Domingue said...

I have those toe straps. What are the buttons? Bought or home made? Two washers and a pop-rivet or what?

VeloOrange said...

Craig, Those are VO Grand Cru Buttons: http://store.velo-orange.com/index.php/accessories/toe-clips-straps-shoes/grand-cru-toe-clip-button.html

danny said...

Voyageoftheeye said above: "All those solid brazed on rack mounts going spare while using odd mounts on the brakes?" ...and that got me thinking. I've got a bike with NO braze-ons EXCEPT brake posts. BUT they are center-pulls. I'd love to know if those racks can be used without ordering them and sending the back if the won't work. Has anybody tried this?

VeloOrange said...

The racks come with regular mounting struts for use on bikes that don't have canti brakes. If you also don't have rack braze-ons, just get the VO p-clamps.

danny said...

Yes But...can you give a direct answer to the question, please? If it's a "yes, we tried that and it can work" you may sell more. If it's " I don't think so and I'm not gonna spend time checkin' it out" Nobody will get mad.

VeloOrange said...

@danny,

For the upper mounts where braze-ons would be, p-clamps are fine and will work. For the lower portion at the dropouts, we haven't tried p-clamps. There are racks available that mount to the axle or quick release should you have ZERO mounting points. Just keep in mind bikes designed with no braze-ons for racks may not handle well with a load.

-Igor