26 October, 2011

New Brakes, Name Needed

These are our new low profile brakes. They have a really long lever arms for amazing stopping power. Remember the old Mafac tandem brakes, these are like a low profile version with a lot more adjustment. The same basic design is being used on some European pro-racer's cross bikes. We think they are perfect for loaded touring, tandems, or for really big riders.

Unlike V-brakes, they use regular brake levers. So you can use your favorite classic levers or non-classic brifters. They have tension adjustment screws and a straddle wire adjuster. They even have slots so you can move the pads up-and-down about 15mm. And they come with toe-in adjustable pads.

About the only feature they lack is a good name. If you come up with the name we use we'll offer you a $100 VO gift certificate. Put your suggestion in a comment, but remember to use your name so we can identify the winner.

BTW, the high profile Grand Cru MK2 brakes are not being discontinued. In fact, they've been selling so well that we ran out again.

Update: Thanks for all the great suggestions. It took a lot of time and more than a few laughs to make a choice. Eventually we picked "Zeste" as in "Velo Orange Zeste". Greg,  please send us an e-mail so we can issue your gift certificate.

149 comments:

darren said...

Touring D'Eiffel brakes

Daniel said...

How about "Trappist"?

You mention Euro CX racers, so I think the Belgian link is nice.

Also, makes for a good analogy -
Trappist Brakes:Gran Cru brakes::fine beer:fine wine

Finally, "Trappist" contains the English word "Trap" - a good notion of what brakes do and these sort of look like a cartoonish bear trap (in a good way)

GeekGuyAndy said...

"Gazelles" came to mind quickly. Just look a picture of their horns!

Anonymous said...

Grand Arrêt ("Big Stop")

I never identify myself online, but one of my VO orders was #100014275

TheGuth said...

How about the somewhat psuedo-french "breforte" for your strong low profile canti brakes. They are beauty, btw!

Rick Risemberg said...

"Space Brakes" (ref cutouts)
"Grande Descente"
"Tour des Alpes"

TheGuth said...

How about the somewhat psuedo-french "breforte" for your strong low-prof cantis. Could me a good addition to your current schema. These are beauty, btw!

Adam said...

"Strong arm"

Mo said...

freins les gens

Uncle Ankle said...

"Crane" brakes.

Jon said...

"Arrêter"

Sean said...

"Bear paw". It's fierce, it's strong, and also a tasty donut variety.

franklyn said...

How about the Lager?

Kyle said...

I would say Nomad, or spell it Nomade for a bit more French flair.

hermesheels said...

Nice cantis always remind me of bridges, so I propose "Millau" brakes, named after what is perhaps the most graceful, trim, and strong structure in France (designed by Norman Foster).
As a bonus, the false homophone "Milao" is Portuguese for Milan(o).
Cheers!

Mark said...

Think of Belgium, known for cyclocross and beer, and thinking of french, I suggest Saison (French for season, and a style of Belgian beer)

Anonymous said...

On a non-name front, I am curious why the VO canti brakes (both this model and the wide profile Grand Cru) use post style pads, rather than threaded. I remember many frustrating hours of trying to adjust old canti brakes just the way I wanted them. Threaded pad holders were such a beautiful revelation to me. I love the look of your these brakes, but I can't imagine buying new brakes with post-style pad holders.

brainwashvictim said...

Why not keep the Gran Cru name and add an "LP" (low profile) designation? Save the fancy new names for frames.

"Gran Cru LP".

Darren said...

Grands Bras!

Anthony Garcia said...

"Ralentir"
It means, simply enough, "to slow down".

Tucker said...

a couple of fun French word hacks:

quant y l'hiver (meaning something like: respect to winter, pron: kawnt-ee-leevair)

frein de grande tour (meaning something like: tall tower brake, pron: frendeh grawn toor)

Tim D said...

Hermesheels, I agree with the bridge idea but was thinking more Ironbridge than Millau.

yeager.joe said...

I propose "Cantique," which means canticle/hymn in French

wombatsucker said...

"Ilium."

I'm at work repairing a book on prehistoric life, and it contains a drawing that illustrates the difference between lizard and bird hips. The drawing of the ilium looked remarkably similar to the outline of the brake.

Moc Artsy said...

Friens de garde.

Erik said...

I think 'UFB' would be perfect.

larry said...

They kind of look like the stylized horns of a bull. How about Taureau?

Moc Artsy said...

"Friens de garde."

larry said...

They kind of look like the stylized horns of a bull. How about Taureau?

Green Path Cycles said...

non plus vite brakes!

Moc Artsy said...

Friens de garde.

Green Path Cycles said...

non plus vite brakes!

Don Stevenson said...

Cantaloup (French spelling, of course)

They create a big canti loop, and you can always say as you embark on a tour, "Cantaloupe tonight!" which is on a par with "Call me a taxi!"

Justus Robert Gunther said...

My vote is for profil bas

Don Stevenson said...

"J'adoube" is something you say in chess when you want to align the pieces without making a move, literally, "I adjust." Sounds like a description of your brake!

Anonymous said...

Haha, Trappist and Grand Arret are excellent ones.

Tom said...

They look like thumbs to me, so 'Big Thumb' or if preffered, Grand Pouce'".

Tom T

Parisian said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Parisian said...

Grand Cross

Thomas Cie... said...

"Incognito" because of the low profile.

Parisian said...

or Cross Cru

Parisian said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Parisian said...

Grand Tour

Anonymous said...

"Profil" by itself sounds better than with the "bas"

Or some semi-rugged French geographic designation-

Vosges
Ardennes
MontBlanc
Pyrenees

last order # 100006900

Brett said...

Canti-Stop-Me-Now

Darrell G said...

How about...

Grand Cru LongArm

Previous VO order #: 100008344

leek1330@gmail.com said...

Gimmee A Brake

Yogurt said...

"Grand Halt" who goes there "brakes"

Ritchie said...

Venus Arms

For two reasons ... One, they resemble a Venus Fly Trap, which is one bad-ass plant. Two, named after Venus de Milo's lost arms, which --legend has it -- broke off during a scuff up between French sailors and some Greek dudes while the statue was en route to the France.

eddmarx said...

These help you stop and smell the roses so how about "Flaneur"?

Guido S. said...

Pollywogs,

or "Pollies" in short.

Name inspired by the Froglegs brakes.

Anonymous said...

Super Reserva, for a change from French (or something like Grande or Super Reserve)

Grande Marque

Premier Cru

Grand Rondeur

Matt M.

Eric said...

Velo Orange Frottement

Rudy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

"Cantinator" For their metal skeleton looks, or if it has to be french: "Cantinateur".
There's also the cantina in it, which goes with the leisurely type of cycling VO promotes.

Danny said...

Grand Cru Lisse

Rudy said...

Or, "Trofee," given their tie to competitive CX?

david said...

Brakes de Resistance

Anonymous said...

How about 'Lorraine,' after the French resistance 'Croix de Lorraine?' French, Low profile, resistance, evoking the Golden Era of Constructeurs.
Michael Burdge

Stephen Lee Ogden said...

Grasshopper Brakes

James B. said...

Roubaix

Andy Squirrel said...

Dog-ear Touring Brakes

Andy Squirrel said...

or rather, in french:
Chien-l'oreille Touring Brakes

Madeline Jean said...

How about Aimée- it means 'beloved', it's french, and it sounds and looks cool.

TJ said...

Keeping it simple I would go with some translation of "little big" brakset. As in it's the little brakeset that does big things.

Options:
French - Peu Grosse Brakeset
Italian - Poco Grande Brakeset
Mix - Peu Grand Brakeset or Poco Grand Brakeset

TJ

the ill postino said...

How about "cul-de-sac"?

Or perhaps Grand Crus "cul-de-sac" Low Profile Canti?

It's a familiar French (more or less) phrase, it's fun to say in French but has a common English pronunciation, and the sorts of one-way streets it evokes are generally a pain for cars but calmer for bicycles and pedestrians.

I also believe that in French you could describe Rue du Chat-qui-Pêche and Impasse Eliane Drivon -- two of the narrowest "streets" in Paris -- as cul de sacs, which seems appropriate for a low profile brake.
-Nate

WickedVT said...

Orange squeezer!

Anonymous said...

Donne-moi une pause (frein)

....just sayin'

Bob G

JP said...

I love all those suggestions in an approximate french !
What about "Normandy", the place where i'm living, and the symbol of rapprochement between US and France !?
Best regards, bien à vous !

riggs said...

Romanee-Canti Grand Cru.

Merci!

Jrome said...

Velo ORANGE Adjust-o-Matic Brakes

bicycletorch said...

Minime Arreter for "slim stopper"

Scott R.

Spevas said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Calvert said...

Pinse Pont

Pinse Jante

Pinse Nez

Spevas said...

In keeping with the French theme, I propose "Confiance," as in "J'ai une entière confiance en toi," (I have complete confidence in you.)

Calvert said...

Leaux Preaux

DennisH said...

How about "VO Stopies"

-if that is not too Rivish

Dennis H

Calvert said...

La Prise

Lachlan said...

How does the stopping power of these compare to the grand cru brakes? I'm in the market for a set of canti's, and it will probably be one of these two options :)

Chris said...

"Sauveteur" - it is after all safety equipment

Steve Butcher said...

When I see these new brakes I think of a dove with it's wings extended. An appropriate name a la Francais then would be "la Colombe".

Garrett said...

Sputnik or Spoutnik (fr)

Joseph said...

Do to the torture in xc: Canti de Sade

Alexander Scamilton said...

How about "Maginot" or "Le Ligne" or something in that vein after the series of fortifications that was supposed to stop anything--even a column of tanks.

One would hope the new brakes do the job better than the namesake I'm proposing...

Barry S. said...

VO Incognito brakes

Barry S. said...

VO Incognito brakes

fcc said...

more partial to Italian and based on the profile: gabbiano

Anonymous said...

fesse grosse, or simply, "big ass". C'est moi. Robert. order#100016403

Tim said...

The Cantibury Trails

You're welcome :D

Anonymous said...

"Les Casses-Noisette de la Montagne du VO" -- pardon my poor French, but you get the idea. Bonus: If Surly buys the design from you, they can just translate the name into English and it will fit right in with their other products.

dwainedibbly said...

"Whoa Nellies" (actually that sounds more like a Rivendell name.)

Anonymous said...

VO Diamante

Tyler said...

Albatross

Jay said...

Stiletto Brakes

- J. Barre

Jay said...

Stiletto Brakes

- J. Barre

Felkerino said...

Given the strong resemblence to a certain Power Brake cantilever made from billet aluminum in the 90s, I submit Cristal.

Barry S. said...

VO Diamante brakes..sorry I keep posting under "anonymous"!

etwarnick said...

How about Grand Cru Touring Cantilever?

andrew said...

Tadpole! look at that shape..

Bicycle Ryder said...

How about Champagne?
Or Croissant?
The latter is a Frenchy pun on 'cross racing and while the former speaks up the quality.

Michael B. Moore said...

Orange Crush

Michael B. Moore said...

or in French, presse orange.

joe said...

Perhaps name it the "F.A.M.A.C." (Frein Avec la Capacité d'Arrêt Massif), or the "C.A.F.A.M." (Capacite Arretant Fort, Avec Magnificence).

People will probably think of them as "that VO brake that looks like the old MAFAC cantis", and it helps strengthen that association, by calling to mind MAFAC and slightly making fun of their odd (yet very French) corporate acronym ("Manufacture Arvernoise de Freins et Accessoires pour Cycles").

As I'm sure you know, MAFAC's been out of business for a couple of decades now, so you won't have to worry about them being bothered.

Matt Hutt said...

For me, cycling has so many sailing connotations - beating into the wind, downwind reaches.. so I think of Mainstays or Strongholds as possibilities

eee said...

The VO ØV

Not a "V" brake...

matt hutt said...

for me, cycling has so many sailing connotations - beating into the wind, downwind reaches. So I think Mainstays or Strongholds would be nice. both are synonyms for levers.

ekr said...

how about
the velo orange "avion" brakes,
or avionne, either french or spanish i guess.
they look like the wings of an airplane.
-Ely

llewellyn said...

For us tourers how aboutどさ回り 【dosamawari】or in english touring,on the road.

Anonymous said...

I'd suggest VO "Onadime" brakes.

-steampunk T.A. 55426

James said...

No name New Brakes
Pate de stop
Turbofrein
Servofrein

Geordan said...

DeCanti

Gran Crosse

Chris's Canti

Strong Stud

CantiClever

Clever Canti

Chris's 'no-calve-cleaving' Canti

CantiCutYourCalves

Uncle Ankle said...

I'd like to shorten my suggestion from the irreverent "Crane" (though also French) to "Cran".

Cran Cantis.

jofegaber said...

"Long John Silver" by Velo Orange...

Me han encantado.

Joshua Clifton said...

"Magnum" for stopping power (i.e. .357 magnum), or if the firearm connection is at all controversial, then for the big champagne bottle, or the Belgian hop variety.

Tom said...

Cisaille - French for wire cutters that the brakes resemble.

Maisons BG said...

Maxi-Canti

Anonymous said...

Lots of cute puns . . .
The main connection I would've made would be to DiaCompe's line of cantis that ruled the roost in the 80s and early 90s. The most popular models had numbers running from around 981 to 987. However, Soma has a canti which seems to evoke the old DC models, the GC 999. So I wouldn't go there. I also like IRD's play on Mafac: Cafam. But I'm tiring of word games. I would just call the new canti Grand Turismo, because of the traditional connotations with the old Campy GT derailleurs and many (canti-equipped) touring bikes through history . . . Actually, I'd say Gran Turismo, but since you're already using Grand in other components, I'd add the "D."
michael white

John Lyons said...

How about Anchorage.

Rudy said...

Dunkirk? The last French town before the Low Countries (home of CX)? Or, where one holds off the Germans on a "fast break"...

Brian said...

How about "Levage", French (I think) for Leverage?

Rolly said...

"L'ecraser Low Profile Cantilever Brakes"

L'ecraser roughly translates to "The Squeeze"

-- Rolly

Anonymous said...

"L'ecraser Low Profile Cantilever Brakes"

L'ecraser roughly translates to "The Squeeze"

-- Rolly (I can send info upon request)

Chris H. said...

"Sven Nys" or vanderRem (from the brake)

andyage said...

When I look at these brakes, I think of the high end CNC MTB/cross brakes of the 90s (esp. Machine Tech). I think these could be called 'Robotique'-french, sophisticated, innovative, modern...

Greg B said...

I enjoy reading the creative submissions. I suggest:

Velo Zest Brakes

It's a bilingual play on words.
Zeste is a French word for Peel, like those of citrus fruits, and in English of course it refers to (Velo) Orange Zest.

If I can make an alternative suggestion, you could call them Can-Can (Canti) Brakes. Distinctive, appropriate, and keeps the Gallic touch.

Drew WIlson said...

maigre

clairet

Eric Maquiling said...

El Diablos

gypsybytrade said...

Tour, or nouveau tour (a tower, trip or "tour")

AllanC said...

VO Deluxe LP
LP Deluxe

Anonymous said...

How about "Le Brake Uglee"?

Ron Whitmire said...

The new brakes seem very bird like to me, I'm suggesting VO Kestrel brakes for the name. No particular reason for Kestrel, I just like the way it sounds.

Anonymous said...

you should call them "Rabobank" brakes.

Garrett said...

Flying V

Anonymous said...

Since you are discontinuing the MK2 brakes, and most of your products are either Grand Cru or VO, and this is your third release, I would propose

Grand Cru Cantilever Tripel or
VO Cantilever Tripel (if you are planning an upscale Grand Cru version.

I didn't spell triple incorrectly, it ties back in with a CX-Belgium theme.

If you pick this I'll send you my contact information.

-Jeff L.

Anonymous said...

Full Nelson Brakes

Greg Snyder

snyder@paulbunyan.net

Nate Knutson said...

Hi there VO. I'd like to make a request: please include some kind of note in the instructions, and maybe even on the product page, that the good way, other than to make a quick fix, to adjust this kind of brake as the pads wear is to move the pads closer to the rim rather than use the barrel adjuster, because the main drawback to this kind of geometry is that mechanical advantage slips outside of the optimal range relatively quickly as the pads wear compared to medium and wide profile brakes. In my experience it's pretty classic for riders of utilitarian road bikes with this geometry of brake (or similar, ie 90s style low-profile brakes) to miss the significance of this and wind up with mediocre braking, and also sometimes with extremely chewed up cables because they thought that they needed to re-anchor them somehwere to fix the problem. Thanks, and I am happy that you're making such a legit version of this design!

nate knutson said...

(I worded that vaguely. By "move the pads closer to the rim" I meant move them in via re-clamping the brake post, resetting the geometry of the brake to the "starting point.")

Anonymous said...

I believe the post says VO is not discontinuing the MK2...

Jenny R. said...

"Prochain Arret" = Next Stop, like on the metro.
Or in Italian, "Prossima Fermata"

MRC said...

longues grands

M Crisp

Adam said...

Long Lovers
kohn35@gmail.com

r32nj@optonline.net said...

"Skeleton Brakes" would be my name suggestion. I really like the cutouts on them.

Anonymous said...

How about "Cafam"?

monsieur-antoine said...

Orange Crush !

Jerome said...

The Michigans.

Cheers!

Ian said...

How about VO-Lo brakes

Jasper said...

Grand Magus, for amazing stopping powers...

Benny said...

Mofocs

Dartanyon Race said...

And not just because I'm from the NW, but they should be called Sasquatch brakes, for stopping big heavy things.