09 June, 2011

Grand Cru Touring Hub are Here

The first batch of production Grand Cru Touring Hubs just arrived. Even though we examined and tested six prototypes, I'm always nervous about new products until I see the ones that are production made. So it's really great to see that the quality and finish is every bit as nice as the hand-assembled prototypes.
The Grand Cru Touring Hub is designed for long distance riding and heavy loads. The sturdy hub shell is our own design. Being a large-flange hub there is room for four identical and rather large cartridge bearings. We use very high quality Japanese bearings. The bearings we chose are a common size and relatively easy to replace if they ever do wear out.

The axle is hollow and oversized. The free-hub body is steel for durability. There are three pawls with sturdy springs. The touring hubs accept 8/9/10 speed Shimano-type cassettes. You can fit a 7 speed cassette by adding a 4.5mm spacer. The VO enclosed-cam quick release skewer is included.

They are available in 130mm and 135mm spacing in 32h and 36h drilling. Matching front hubs are also available.

The video we posted a few weeks ago showing how to disassemble the Grand Cru hub for field servicing without tools can be found here.
They have been selling very well since we added them to the site late yesterday. I expect we'll run out before the second batch arrives later this summer. As soon as we have sufficient stock we'll have some built up with Raid rims and with Diagonale rims. The very first set of 36h is going on my bike.

21 comments:

twblalock said...

The video seems to be broken.

Anonymous said...

What's the noise level like? It is closer to Shimano hubs or is it angry-bee-swarm Phil Wood?

Chris Kulczycki said...

The video works on my computer. I pushed the start arrow and it started. maybe it was a temporary glitch. Anyone else having a problem with it?

If hub noise is an issue simply pull the freehub body off (no tools required) and put a drop of oil on each pawl. That really quiets them down. It works for most hubs, not just ours.

misterarthur said...

Gorgeous.

Anonymous said...

love the holes. reminds me of Campy Tipo.

.s.s. said...

I got attacked by killer bees while bike touring in guatemala.

David og Francisca said...

I have tried watching the video several times over the past weeks. (obsternate geek, I know)...
Each time with the text oops, something broke, try again later...

Samuel said...

I would like to see a solid-axle version with 40h or 48h option for more heavy duty use

Shane said...

Nice looking hubs, you should stock lots of extra caps and dust guards. I'm a mechanic and we have had dozens of people stop in looking for hub parts lost in shipping or transport. When you make another round thread the axle so you can use two #5's to disassemble.

Shane said...

Great looking Hubs. You should stock lots of extra end caps. I'm a mechanic and we have dozens of people looking for hub end caps that were lost in shipping and transport. I prefer threaded axles that disassemble with two #5's for this reason.

Anonymous said...

I would love to buy the Hi/Lo version, but all my bikes have Campagnolo Cassettes. Lots of riders with Campy bikes who would love this hub too.

Adam said...

So you're telling me that I can get a field serviceable cassette hub for $160? And if I am not sold on the bearings, I can get Phil replacements for cheap money?

Shut up and take my money.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, I'm still getting an "oops something broke" at vimeo. They look like awesome hubs, although the touring bike i'm planning will be running disks. Don't suppose there is any chance of that? Please??? :-)

Anonymous said...

Mr K,

Whatever happened to the idea of a modern interpretation of the Maxi-Car "Grandes Flasques" with the linked spoke holes-- so a broken drive-side spoke can be replaced right on the bike? Were there patent difficulties or machine-shop obstreperousness?

Because I would order early and often. Particularly if I had a solid-axle option.


-eponodyne

Chris Kulczycki said...

eponodyne,

We tested a version of this hub with linked spoke holes and almost everyone preferred the pull-off free-hub body. You can simply pull off the cassette and body, replace the spoke, and push it back on. Linked holes also made lacing the wheel more difficult.

Anonymous said...

Chris,
Sorry to hijack the post, but when will the dyno hubs be back in stock?

Chuck Davis said...

I have a set of the hubs built upon Raid 36x DT DB14/15 at the shoppe

The rims built up nicely, may have the set sold already!

Anonymous said...

Yoong

I am writing to you from Japan now.

It s nice looking hub. You seem to get your idea from a very old Campy Interchageable hub,don't you.

Since I love Campy staffs, I would like to use your wonderful invention on my 700c Rando. Is any way to install Campy cassette on your hub?

VeloOrange said...

Yoong, We will have Campy compatible cassette bodies for the hubs in a few months.

Ingmar said...

Hi,

Do you have any idea when the Campagnolo cassette bodies will be available?

I am thinking about these hubs for my new Gios Super Record which will be build up with Campagnolo specifications.

Simon said...

Great hubs!
I've put a video up on youtube so people can hear how loud the freewheel is.
The hubs are so smooth they just want to spin forever.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOVx235clc8