11 March, 2011

Grand Cru Hubs Arrive, Including Dyno Hub

We just received an air shipment of VO Grand Cru hubs. We have the high flange freewheel hubs in 126mm and 130mm spacing and in 32 and 36-hole. We also have matching front hubs. The long awaited switchable dyno hubs are also in the shipment. We'll try to get them all onto the website very soon with full details. The fixed and cassette hubs should be in the next shipment. BTW, they do come with quick releases. Here are a few photos:

19 comments:

WickedCold said...

Any plans to offer these in pre-built wheel packages?

fmackay said...

Very picky I know - but it would be nice if the lightening holes were lined up with the spoke holes. Looks as though one of the front hub flanges is almost right but this appears coincidental. Look at this for example (the drilling on those hubs varies with spoke count - I have a 28h version with 7 big holes per side).

How light is the action on the dynohub switching ring? The holes in it have me imagining some sort of cable operated lever on the fork allowing handlebar control with an old friction shifter...

Chris Kulczycki said...

We will have pre-built wheels, but it'll take a couple of months, or more, to have them all built.

There may be a lever operated handlebar dynamo switch one day, that's why the holes are there.

Anonymous said...

This comment is regarding the regular (non-dyno) hubs. Based on the depth of the lightening holes the flanges look very beefy, which in my book is good. Axle area diameter also seems "overbuilt." Very nice. Price point?

Johnny said...

I'd like to build a wheel around this hub. I'm using a 700c Diagonale rim. Can anyone suggest appropriate spoke lengths? Many thanks!

Johnny said...

I'd like to build a wheel around his hub (32 hole). I'm using a 700c diagonale rim. Can anyone suggest appropriate spoke lengths? Many thanks!

Anonymous said...

Having the lightening holes NOT lining up perfectly with the spoke holes adds strength. Mother Nature designs things to be slightly "off" or "random" in her designs.

Halfstep said...

I guess there's no reason that the 126 mm hub couldn't spaced for a 5 speed freewheel as well?

Dave said...

Any chance of getting the dyno hub with mounts for roller or disc brakes? Or an integrated drum brake? Some of us love clean rims!

Joel said...

I assume the switch is the 6-point star plate. Why is it so big? Is this so one can flip it with their toe while riding?

Thanks, Joel

eaglerock said...

I wouldn't think you could flip that plate with your toe while riding; the plate should be on the inside of the fork blade. If you have front panniers mounted, those would also block access.

Of course, that ignores the peril of sticking your toe near the spokes of a rotating wheel, which seems like a super-bad idea.

As Chris mentions, there "may be a lever operated handlebar dynamo switch one day"...but I agree; it's a honkin' big plate for an anticipated mechanism that doesn't exist yet.

Anonymous said...

Will the skewers be available separately?

Timothy said...

The manufacturer advertises that switch plate as operable by foot when *stopped*, not while riding.

Timothy said...

The manufacturer advertises that switch plate as operable by foot when *stopped*, not while riding.

NatMc said...

I'm also wondering about the hugeness of that star plate on the dyno-hub. Looks like the project brief listed three objectives:

1. Make it produce electricity.
2. Make it shiny.
3. Make it really hard to lace the spokes.

Done, done and done.


But in all seriousness, some very nice-looking products. Good work guys!

Joel said...

I still don't understand why it's so big. Regardless of whether it's thumb or lever operated, it could be way smaller.

Chris, can you add any info. here?

Alec said...

The switch might be a little big, but it also looks dandy, and big means more leverage for flipping, which means that the switch can have a more positive action, which means that the tolerances stay where they should be with regards to clearance between the armature and claw-pole magnets, which is key, key, key for an alternator.

It's not hard to lace at all - flip it on and off a couple times while you're doing the left side and you're in good shape. It'd only be "really hard" if the switch didn't move, but it does, 'cause it's a switch.

Please don't try to flip it while riding. The switch is part of the hub shell, not the axle, so it spins when the wheel spins. You don't want to stick your fingers or toes or anything else into a spinning metal thing, really. For the same reason, retrofitting a cable-operated control could be rather complicated.

Skewers are the same as the ones for sale on the site here. All our hubs include them, as well.

masmojo said...

Looking at the pictures at first I thought the Switch on the Dyno hub was a disk brake mount, but it obviously was not drilled as such. So then I figured it had something to do with the switch! While that may be, it certainly looks as though it is missing something(?); (ergo: the handle bar activator) because it does not look to be finger or toe friendly!

Still, they are very classy looking! ironically as retro as I am all the bikes I need to put lights on are Disc brake bikes!

Anonymous said...

Chris:

Are the 700C Polyvents and the DC touring frames definites? If so, when do you think you'd have them? Depending on the specs, I'd be interested in one or the other. Thanks.