02 May, 2007

Richie's New Portfolio

Ask the average cyclist to name a frame builder and it's likely that "Richard Sachs" is the only name they'll come up with. Richie's name recognition comes from decades of superb frame building. There are not many builders around that started in 1972. And it helps that he possesses more than a little marketing savvy. How many frame builders have appeared in dozens of magazine and newspaper articles, sponsored their own cyclo-cross team, and have their own lines of lugs?

The latest effort from The House of Richie is a book, no a portfolio, of his frames. The 21 pages are filled with exquisite photographs by Jeffery Weir, who also shoots for Calvin Klein, Nike, Panerei, Lipton, Mikimoto.... (You see what sort of company we're in.) It covers the Richard Sachs signature series road and cyclo-cross bikes in mouth-watering detail. There are no randonnuese yet, but he did say something about a turnpike hunter in his last e-mail. Pretty cool ATMO.

As for the price, if you have to ask....

21 comments:

Anonymous said...

ATMO?

Dave Cramer said...

According To My Opinion

Anonymous said...

Australian Trade Marks Office

david_nj said...

Those bikes are, well, above average.

... waaaaaaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyy above average.

;-)

e-RICHIE said...

"... but he did say something about a turnpike hunter in his last e-mail."

i'm working on an E-ZPass hunter for trips across the tappan zee atmo...

Brian said...

What? No wicker baskets from the lug master?

Craig said...

I hate to say it but I would take a Vanilla cyclo-cross frame by Sacha White over a Richard Sachs frame...
flame away :)

Anonymous said...

That's up to you, but you'll wait just as long.

Sacha does some very, very, very nice work, but if we're talking Cross, omfg, I'd go with Richie every day and twice on Sunday.

(OK, not on Saturday)

Anonymous said...

Whatever happened to the Frame Builder Expert Article set?

You quit just when things started getting interesting. Personally I think your bikes are the Peach.

Any more Frame Builder expert articles would provide benefits to your customer base for reference only, to set you apart.

Thank You!

neil berg said...

What I like about Richie's bikes is they are tools, like someone said of the 70s Cinelli SC - weapons to attack with. You can cover them up with slick, shiney paint, but that's not what they're all about.

Anonymous said...

I heart ATMO but I'd rather drool over a glossy book of Peter Weigle bikes.

Joel said...

Why not share the love with both Vanilla and Sachs (and, VO and Coast, and quite a few others - what times we live in)?

Almost all of the custom and even semi-custom builders out there have long wait times, meaning demand is wonderfully high.

No reason to say one is better than the other when there are so many good builders. The one you choose is up to you.

neil berg said...

May I throw Curt Goodrich's name into the ring. I'm about half way through his 24 month queue. At this level I don't think that one builder is necessarily better the another, it's more a matter of style and approach. Curt got my nod because he is local and does very nice work.

david_nj said...

Neil you guys are the connoisseurs not me but having seen the work of these guys (and having had the pleasure of riding a RS), it's my unsophisticated/ ignorant/ redneck opinion that the Weigles and Sachses are a significant cut above. Goodrich does make a mean fillet-brazed city bike though; then again so does Chris's guy Ahrens.

Alan said...

I'm a fairly lazy rider (speed is not one of my assets) but the red racing bike on Sach's web site is one sweet looking rig.

JoelMatthews said...

Speaking of VO's builder, wonder if Mr. Coast would make a frame with specs to accomodate some of the wonderful NOS products Chris is sourcing recently.

The Pelissier hubs and the bars and stems would look real nice on the road VO.

And David, I am no expert, but Goodrich has made some mighty fine bikes. I think at this level you have to figure in what Kierkegaard says about subjectivity being reality and reality being subjectivity.

Anonymous said...

"it's my unsophisticated/ ignorant/ redneck opinion that the Weigles and Sachses are a significant cut above."
Weigle most definitely. Vanilla probably more often than not. I had a Vanilla and sold it a while back. The workmanship was certainly first rate but I never warmed to the geometry - which I left completely in the hands of the builder - and it was the only bike I have ever owned that had a completely unacceptable amount of toe overlap. It was a very real issue - I clipped my feet enough times in a serious enough manner to know that the bike wasn't for me.

39Cross said...

ATMO, for 75 clams there'd better be pix of some shagadelic babes in that 'lil red book.

david_nj said...

I knew Kierkegaard would make it onto this blog somehow. Too little of that stuff in my trailer park. Phew.

;-)

Chris Kulczycki said...

Joel, Johnny could make a frame to use those parts, any builder could. The changes required would be very very minor. In fact you could use them on almost any stock frame if you simply re-space the rear dropouts, about 15-minutes work.

Anonymous said...

yeah, and most steel frames, you don't even have to respace them. There's enough flex that a couple of millimeters axle length really makes no practical difference. Might sound uncool to fussy types, but people do it all the time with zero side effects.

michael white